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New Silicon Knights 'Siren in the Maelstrom' Project Unveiled

50°
282w ago - Canadian developer Silicon Knights may have inadvertently announced its latest project.

It appears as though the Too Human developer has been partnering with Telefilm Canada; the nation's cultural agency that hands out production and development grants to the entertainment sector.

To quote: A thread on consumer forum [Register or Login to view links] first discovered that an apparent Silicon Knights project - entitled Siren in the Maelstrom - is listed on [Register or Login to view links]'s list of partners.



Silicon Knights, developer of Eternal Darkness and Too Human, has made no announcement regarding this new project. 


 

Nano switch hints at future chips

50°
349w ago - World's smallest transistor, one atom thick and 10 atoms wide, out of a material that could one day replace silicon. The transistor, essentially an on/off switch, has been made using graphene, a two-dimensional material first discovered only four years ago.

Graphene is a single layer of graphite, which is found in the humble pencil. The transistor is the key building block of microchips and the basis for almost all electronics.

Dr Kostya Novoselov and Professor Andre Geim from The School of Physics and Astronomy at The University of Manchester have been leading research into the potential application of graphene in electronics and were the first to separate a sheet of the material from graphite

Super material

Graphene has been hailed as a super material because it has many potential applications. It is a flat molecule, with only the thickness of an atom, and both very stable and robust.

The researchers are also looking at its use in display technology - because it is transparent.

The Manchester-based scientists have shown that graphene can be carved into tiny electronic circuits with individual transistors not much larger than a molecule.

Dr Novoselov told BBC News that graphene had many advantages over silicon because it could...
 

Silicon chips stretch into shape

50°
351w ago - Normally fragile and brittle silicon chips have been made to bend and fold, paving the way for a new generation of flexible electronic devices.

The stretchy circuits could be used to build advanced brain implants, health monitors or smart clothing.

The complex devices consist of concertina-like folds of ultra-thin silicon bonded to sheets of rubber.

Writing in the journal Science, the US researchers say the chip's performance is similar to conventional electronics.

"Silicon microelectronics has been a spectacularly successful technology that has touched virtually every part of our lives," said Professor John Rogers of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, one of the authors of the paper.

But, he said, the rigid and fragile nature of silicon made it very unattractive for many applications, such as biomedical implants.

"In many cases you'd like to integrate electronics conformably in a variety of ways in the human body - but the human body does not have the shape of a silicon wafer."

Professor Zhenqiang Ma of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who also works on flexible silicon circuitry, said the new research was an "important step".

"Completely integrated, extremely bendable circuits have been talked about for...
 

Printing displays screen promise

50°
352w ago - Flat-panel computer displays could be manufactured quickly and cheaply using novel inkjet printing equipment demonstrated by Japanese scientists.

The technique has already been used to produce the delicate wiring and tiny components needed for flexible screens.

The new inkjet head is able to produce drops 1,000 times smaller than standard printers, according to the researchers.

Writing in the journal PNAS, the team say the technique also improves the performance of printed circuits.

"The present work demonstrates the feasibility of employing inkjet technology... for electronic device applications," the University of Tokyo team write in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Plastic power

Researchers have been exploring the use of printing for building electronic devices for a number of decades.

"Printed electronics could be much bigger than silicon as they have relevance to other applications such as lighting and photovoltaics," Dr Peter Harrop of research firm IDTechEx told BBC News.

The technique holds particular promise for so-called "organic" electronics, also known as plastic electronics.

These rugged devices are made from organic polymers - already used to make bin bags and solar panels, for...
 

New boom-time for British tech?

50°
381w ago - Britain is still home to some of the world's best scientists - but when it comes to giving them the money to turn their ideas into world-beating companies we are third-rate. True?
 
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