Sponsored Links

Sponsored Links

 

Burnin' Rubber for PSP and PS3 Minis is Now Available on PSN

50°
223w ago - G1M2 Founder Scott Hawkins has announced today that Burnin' Rubber (aka Bump 'n' Jump) for PSP and PS3 Minis is now available on PSN for $3.99.

To quote: We are very excited to announce the release of our latest PlayStation Minis game, Burnin' Rubber, arriving for PSP (and PS3) on Tuesday June 22.

Burnin' Rubber is a classic arcade game that was originally released by [Register or Login to view links] in 1982. Many people also know this game by the name [Register or Login to view links]

In addition to driving really fast (hence the name "Burnin' Rubber"), you have the ability to crash into other cars and launch your car high up in the air to avoid obstacles, clear water gaps, and crush opponents from above (hence the alternative name "Bump 'n' Jump").

Players earn points by taking out other cars and by making progress through each of the courses in the game. There is a little known bonus for clearing a level without taking out any enemies – but I personally prefer to smash as many cars as possible!

We added some cool extra features to the PlayStation Minis version of the game including the ability to save and load your game at any point, toggle arcade game settings, and...
 

Silicon chips stretch into shape

50°
339w ago - Normally fragile and brittle silicon chips have been made to bend and fold, paving the way for a new generation of flexible electronic devices.

The stretchy circuits could be used to build advanced brain implants, health monitors or smart clothing.

The complex devices consist of concertina-like folds of ultra-thin silicon bonded to sheets of rubber.

Writing in the journal Science, the US researchers say the chip's performance is similar to conventional electronics.

"Silicon microelectronics has been a spectacularly successful technology that has touched virtually every part of our lives," said Professor John Rogers of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, one of the authors of the paper.

But, he said, the rigid and fragile nature of silicon made it very unattractive for many applications, such as biomedical implants.

"In many cases you'd like to integrate electronics conformably in a variety of ways in the human body - but the human body does not have the shape of a silicon wafer."

Professor Zhenqiang Ma of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who also works on flexible silicon circuitry, said the new research was an "important step".

"Completely integrated, extremely bendable circuits have been talked about for...
 

Self-healing rubber bounces back

50°
345w ago - A material that is able to self-repair even when it is sliced in two has been invented by French researchers.

The as-yet-unnamed material - a form of artificial rubber - is made from vegetable oil and a component of urine.

The substance, described in the journal Nature, produces surfaces when cut that retain a strong chemical attraction to each other.

Pieces of the material join together again as if never parted without the need for glue or a special treatment.

This remarkable property comes from careful engineering of the molecules in the material.

The French researchers are already making kilogramme quantities in their Paris laboratories and say the process is almost completely green, and could be completely so with a few adjustments.

'Tiny hands'

The secret of the substance lies in how the molecules are held together.

A piece of normal rubber, says Dr Ludwik Leibler, who headed the research, is actually a single molecule with billion upon billions of smaller units chemically welded together to form a giant tangled network.

The elasticity comes from the fact that the strands within the network are buckled like a concertina: pull on them and they straighten and elongate; let go and the buckles reappear.
 
Sponsored Links

Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links

Sponsored Links






Advertising - Affiliates - Contact Us - PS3 Downloads - Privacy Statement - Site Rules - Top - © 2014 PlayStation 3 News

Sponsored Links