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Rumor: Possible Hardware Exploit in PS3 Controller?

300°
329w ago - Manucc1, a member of Spanish community Elotrolado (linked above), believes there may be a possible PS3 exploit in the PS3 Controller... although SIXAXIS or DS3 is not specified, and it could work in a similar manner to the Pandora Batteries in the PSP.

This claim is based primarily on speculation that in the PS3 controller there is a chip that is the same as on PSP, and it is alleged to control Firmware in some fashion.

Info on the chip is available HERE, and a list of IC chips in PS3 is available HERE.

This EEPROM chip may allow Firmware to be installed (when you install Firmware on PS3, you always have to use the controller... before 2.1, you had to plug the controller in via USB).

For those who don't speak Spanish, they are currently looking into the contents of the chip and seeing whether this will lead to anything more.. but have long way to go yet.
 

Activision Still Calls Console Hardware Prices "Prohibitive"

50°
330w ago - When the PlayStation 3 launched with a $600 price tag for the full 60GB version, many began to question if the price of video game hardware had suddenly gotten a bit out of control. Now, though, the $400 price tag for the PS3 and 360 is far more agreeable, and the Wii retails for an even cheaper price.

Recently, we've seen plenty of evidence to indicate that consumers are having less difficulty with the price of consoles (especially the PS3), but Activision still thinks it's all too expensive.

According to a Times Online interview with Activision CEO Bobby Kotick, one of the world's leading game publishers holds firm to the belief that console price cuts are essential, especially in this economy. He did admit to seeing a "real demographic expansion with the industry's customer base," but at the same time, the cost for running out and picking up a game console is still "prohibitive."

Kotick does add, however, that the game industry tends to do very well in slower economies for the simple fact that more people tend to stay home (it just gets too expensive to go out). This much, the NPD has all but proven in recent months, and games like Grand Theft Auto IV and Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots have helped to spur hardware sales.

But you'll still find plenty of gamers...
 

Reeves: PSP Piracy Drives Hardware Sales, Sometimes

50°
332w ago - It's clear that piracy on the PSP is a problem. We know it, and so does Sony Computer Entertainment Europe head David Reeves. But it's not all bad, at least for Sony, as Reeves admits that piracy on the platform has driven hardware sales at times. On the whole, though, he isn't happy about it, obviously.

To quote: There is a piracy problem on PSP. We know about it, we know how it's done. It sometimes fuels the growth of hardware sales, but on balance we are not happy about it.

Following up to his previous statement, Reeves said that Sony will "unveil new ways to combat piracy soon."

Sounds good, but it may be just talk with little action resulting, taking their previous efforts into account. Time will tell...
 

Nintendo Wii Hardware Architecture Diagram available!

50°
332w ago - Bushing has posted a Nintendo Wii Hardware Architecture Diagram recently.

To quote from his page linked above: Inspired by henke37's idea of making a diagram that shows how the different processors on the Wii relate to each other, I took a stab at it. I got a little carried away I guess.

I can't promise everything here is right - there are just too many things we don't know, and even some of the things we do know, we don't all agree on.

So, here's my first attempt at summing it all up...
 

The Truth About Xbox 360 Hardware Failures

200°
333w ago - When Microsoft Corp. announced a mammoth global recall of its Xbox 360 a year ago, the software giant never disclosed the exact source of the game console's heat problem that led to the fiasco.

Now, in an unlikely venue at Design Automation Conference here, Bryan Lewis, research vice president and chief analyst at Gartner, disclosed that the problem started in a graphic chip. Lewis offered this offhand revelation while discussing the changing ASIC and ASSP landscape for his DAC audience.

The Xbox 360 recall a year ago happened because "Microsoft wanted to avoid an ASIC vendor," said Lewis. Microsoft designed the graphic chip on its own, cut a traditional ASIC vendor out of the process and went straight to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. Ltd., he explained.

But in the end, by going cheap--hoping to save tens of millions of dollars in ASIC design costs, Microsoft ended up paying more than $1 billion for its Xbox 360 recall.

To fix the problem, Microsoft went back to an unnamed ASIC vendor based in the United States and redesigned the chip, Lewis added. (Based on a previous report, the ASIC vendor is most likely the former ATI Technologies, now part of AMD.)

Asked the moral of the story, Lewis said: "Had Microsoft left the graphics processor design to...
 
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