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Call of Duty: World at War Interview with Tech Specs and More!

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322w ago - PCGH: What will be the base technology of Call of Duty: World at War? Do you as a new developer write a brand new engine from scratch of do you reuse many parts of the technology of Call of Duty 4? Why do you decide program a new engine/modify the existing technology?

Cesar Stastny: Treyarch has worked on various games during the last decade so we had our own engines, including the one on which all the Spiderman games were built. For Call of Duty: World at War, we chose the original Infinity Ward Call of Duty4: Modern Warfare engine as the base technology. Call of Duty 4 is widely considered the best cross platform game to date (Xbox 360/PS3/PC), so it is logical to consider its engine as the best next generation cross platform as well.

We chose it for its excellent lighting and game scripting. We enhanced the existing Call of Duty 4 engine with visual improvements, new effects, cooperative multiplayer, as well as using Activision's proprietary DemonWare technology for online, lobbies, matchmaking on PC and PS3 platforms which do not come with the equivalent of Xbox Live.

PCGH: Call of Duty 4 was developed cross platform and there were no major differences between the console and the PC version as far as visuals and other technical aspects is concerned. Will this be the case for Call of Duty:...
 

Sony brings PlayStation 3 interface to the big screen

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327w ago - Sony declares "game on" as Adam Turner discovers the PS3's menu system is now built into Bravia televisions.

The user interface seems to be an afterthought on many consumer electronic devices, but Sony has obviously had its UI boffins working overtime (playing games consoles - nice work if you can get it).

They've decided that the XMB (Xross Media Bar) menu system used by the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Portable is more friendly that the menus used by Sony's big-arse Bravia LCD televisions, so the new generation of Bravias will utilise the PS3's menu system.

The old Bravias were designed around a standard tree-like menu system, with options opening up to the right as you scroll down through the categories. The Bravia's Xross Media Bar menus are built around a similar concept, the menus are sightly more animated but it still requires you to scroll down through categories as your options pop up on the right.

The Xross Media Bar actually has a similar look and feel to the Vista Media Centre interface and even the changes in Windows Mobile 6.1.

The Bravia's move to Xross Media Bar is more cosmetic than functional, yet I can't deny that I prefer it over the old Bravia menus. Smooth and responsive menus reduce the feeling that you're fighting with a device....
 

Sony Announces: PlayStation-edu!

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328w ago - From the PS Blog today: The games industry is always on the look-out for new, talented engineers and programmers who understand how the hardware works under the hood. However, it isn't possible to buy a PlayStation development kit at your local computer store and development for the PlayStation has remained a mystery, even to very interested individuals.

It gives me great pleasure to unveil the mystery and announce the PlayStation-edu program! We expect this program to be a great tool to teach students about the PlayStation platforms.

PlayStation-edu is a program for universities and colleges to get access to PS2 and PSP development kits...the same ones that professional developers use to make the games you love to play. You get the development software, the hardware, and the SDK to learn and experiment with. SCEA wants to make sure that students who are graduating from college are ready to program on PlayStation hardware and that means getting it into your hands.

PlayStation-edu is not a general game creation program (sorry artists and designers). It is for computer science and engineering students who want to understand how the hardware works in the PlayStation consoles. Schools which teach game programming or computer architecture can use the development kits in their classes.
 

Asus Versus Gigabyte - It's All Over?

50°
329w ago - If you've been waiting with bated breath for the battle between motherboard giants Asus and Gigabyte to come to blows, it looks like your hopes may come to naught after all.

For a while it looked like Asus was going to take Gigabyte to court over claims the company made regarding the quality of Asus's products, not to mention the veracity of information provided regarding its Energy Processing Unit technology.

With Gigabyte insisting that it did nothing wrong and it was all Asus's fault for passing off shoddy hardware, everyone was waiting for the inevitable courtroom showdown and damages settlement.

Now, however, saner heads at Gigabyte have made the decision to issue a very public apology for the slurs cast upon its competitor's good name before the company finds itself in front of an unamused judge.

According to Digitimes, who broke the news on Friday, Gigabyte has slunk off into the sunset still grumbling that its DES technology is the better option for power saving than Asus's EPU but will smooth things over by paying for an apology to be published in various Taiwanese news publications.

Asus, knowing a good result when it sees one, has in turn agreed that this little spat needn't see the inside of a courtroom and has dropped all legal proceedings against Gigabyte.
 

Group Test: Firefox 3 vs IE 7 vs Safari 3.1

200°
329w ago - Microsoft's Internet Explorer 7 is the leading web browser, but the fresh-outta-beta Firefox 3 and Apple's Safari 3.1 are gunning for its crown, each claiming new speed records. So which is the fastest? We fired up all three to find out

A few short years ago the browser war seemed dead and buried. After Microsoft's Internet Explorer usurped Netscape's Navigator in the late 1990s, it's domination of the Internet seemed complete, over 95 percent of us using a version of IE.

Those days are gone. The guts of Navigator were reborn in 2004 as Firefox, a browser that has been drinking more and more of IE's milkshake ever since. Firefox now owns at least 18 percent of the market, with some estimates giving it more than a quarter.

More recently, Apple has threatened to start a three-way fight, using the software updater included with iTunes to slip its Safari browser onto PCs. While its market share is miniscule - less than one per cent among PC users and around three per cent overall -Safari offers a PC users a credible third choice.

Meanwhile, IE 7 is groaning under the weight of bad press, criticised for its instability and sluggish performance. Apple is trumpeting Safari 3.1 as the world's fastest browser, while Firefox 3 - which is now out of beta and into the...
 
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