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British Police Now Allowed to Hack Into Your Private Computer

200°
293w ago - The power of anti-piracy organizations is constantly growing and latest news from Great Britain sounds somehow scary: The Home Office has adopted a new policy that will allow police to hack into British people's computer systems without a warrant.

The hacking known as 'remote searching' allows officers to covertly examine the hard drive of people's PC's anywhere. E-mails, Web browsing habits and messaging conversations can all be gathered.

To quote: The Home Office has quietly adopted a new plan to allow police across Britain routinely to hack into people's personal computers without a warrant.

The move, which follows a decision by the European Union's council of ministers in Brussels, has angered civil liberties groups and opposition MPs. They described it as a sinister extension of the surveillance state which drives "a coach and horses" through privacy laws. The hacking is known as "remote searching".

It allows police or MI5 officers who may be hundreds of miles away to examine covertly the hard drive of someone's PC at his home, office or hotel room. Material gathered in this way includes the content of all e-mails, web-browsing habits and instant messaging.

Under the Brussels edict, police across the EU have been given the green light to expand...
 

Computer Mouse Celebrates 40th Birthday

100°
298w ago - It was only meant to be a prototype. But 40 years after the computer mouse first scrolled its way into the public consciousness, new touch-screen technology could be about to consign the mouse to the annals of history.

The computer mouse was the creation of Doug Engelbart and his team at the Stanford Research Institute in California, who needed a simple way of controlling their computers. The result was a carved wooden block mounted on wheels, with a long cable trailing out the back. One researcher nicknamed it a mouse, and the moniker stuck.

"We thought that when it had escaped out to the world it would have a more dignified name," said Mr Engelbart. "But it didn't."

The mouse made its debut at a presentation in San Francisco in 1968 to show off a working network computer system. Before the invention of the mouse, people working on computers used a light pen, similar to those wielded by radar operators during the war, to navigate around on screen. The research team at the Institute set about finding an alternative, and went through a range of designs before finally settling on the mouse.

"We set up our experiments and the mouse won in every category, even though it had never been used before," said Mr Engelbart. "It was faster, and with it people made fewer mistakes....
 

Operate Your Computer with Wii Controllers

50°
312w ago - Nintendo doesn't exactly advertise it, but the remotes for the Wii gaming console (including the balance board that comes with Wii Fit) have Bluetooth capabilities.

That means you can connect your Wii peripherals to your computer to operate the media center hooked up to your TV, play emulated games with a Nunchuk, Classic Controller, or even a Balance Board, and pretty much have them do anything you can do with a keyboard. Let's walk through linking up your Wii peripherals and putting them in control of your Mac, PC, or Linux box.

To give you an idea of what you can do with a Wii/PC hook-up, here's a look at one neat example: Controlling Windows Media Center from a distance, without having to shell out for a separate remote control.

Video is courtesy of Flickr can be seen HERE, and the software setup can been seen at the link up top of this news article.

Enjoy!
 

Cuba lifts ban on Home Computers

100°
328w ago - The first legalised home computers have gone on sale in Cuba, but a ban remains on internet access. This is the latest in a series of restrictions on daily life which President Raul Castro has lifted in recent weeks.

Crowds formed at the Carlos III shopping centre in Havana, though most had come just to look. The desktop computers cost almost $800 (£400), in a country where the average wage is under $20 (£10) a month.

But some Cubans do have access to extra income, much of it from money sent by relatives living abroad. Since taking over the presidency in February, Raul Castro has ended a range of restrictions and allowed Cubans access to previously banned consumer goods.

In recent weeks thousands of Cubans have snapped up mobile phones and DVD players. But only now have the first computer stocks arrived.

Internet access remains restricted to certain workplaces, schools and universities on the island.

The government says it is unable to connect to the giant undersea fibre-optic cables because of the US trade embargo. All online connections today are via satellite which has limited bandwidth and is expensive to use.

Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez, Cuba's ally and a critic of the US, is laying a new cable under the Caribbean.

It remains...
 

Sony Computer Entertainment to increase penetration in India

50°
347w ago - Sony Computer Entertainment (SCE) has announced its itention to capitlize on the growing popularity of gaming in India.

A Sony spokesperson commented that the Indian games market is expected to grow by 78 percent by 2010 and barely one percent of its gaming potential has been reached. Therefore Sony is aiming to increase its penetration in the top 20 cities of India.

To quote: "The Indian gaming market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 78 per cent by 2010, and barely one per cent of the country's gaming potential has been tapped," said Atindriya Bose, country manager (PlayStation) for Sony Computer Entertainment. " However, we are still at a very nascent stage, even though there is a lot of potential for the industry," he added.

The vendor is aiming to increase its penetration in the top 20 cities of the country by selecting partners on the basis of their sales potential as well as their capability of selling entertainment products. " We are looking forward to have a phase wise distribution pattern, and hence aiming to have around 3-4 quality product centers in these cities," said Bose.
 
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