Sponsored Links

Sponsored Links

 

Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix

50°
350w ago - The man behind the rebalanced Super Street Fighter II will destroy you. David Sirlin has competed in SF tournaments since 1991, represented the USA at Japan's Super Battle Opera tournament, playtested every Capcom Classics re-release of the games and literally wrote the book on competitive gaming. He's also got a cool site where he writes fascinating essays on game design.

Human Street Fighter encyclopedia Sirlin knows the series better even than its creators, so when he tells the world that HD Remix is the true sixth revision of the most successful beat-'em-up series ever, it's press-stoppingly serious business. HD Remix may have started as a polished remake, but with tweaks and fixes it's now a whole new game - scrubbed up, more accessible for newcomers, and rebalanced for tournament play at the highest levels.

The strongest characters, namely Balrog, Dhalsim and Vega, are untouched save for dampening their most overpowered combos, and chumps like Cammy, T. Hawk and Zangief have been beefed up considerably. The relative strengths have been maintained, but the gaps between characters are now compressed so the very weakest character is no longer a ten-second body bag case for the toughest.
 

New videos of Home's latest update

50°
350w ago - Remember those 2 walktrough videos about Home made by DLB that spread all around the net?

Well, he just did some new videos where he explains the new functions from the update. Looks really cool, i advice you to check them out!

Videos can be seen here:








 

PS3 Theme Extractor/Unpacker v0.8 released!

50°
350w ago - Anoop Menon has updated his PS3 Theme Extractor/Unpacker today to v0.8!

Download: PS3 Theme Extractor v0.8 [Windows] / PS3 Theme Extractor v0.8 SRC [Linux]

Changelog:

12/03/07 -0.8- fixed a bug in the XML output filename.
 

Preview: Dark Void

50°
350w ago - Right, we're gonna get two words off our chests straight off the bat. Crimson. Skies. See, you won't read many previews of Dark Void without the inevitable mention of this all-but-forgotten stylised Xbox airplane shooter, which sadly joined such luminaries as Beyond Good and Evil and the ace Psychonauts in the 'bloody great but no bugger bought them' category of videogames. Which was a real shame, since it was very good indeed.

Still, it looks as if somebody pretty senior at Capcom still believes in devs Airtight Games, and the result is Dark Void. Dirge plot aside (some ancient devils who used to rule over Earth but were turned upon by humankind have risen again for vengeance) Dark Void is every inch a sexed-up next gen Crimson Skies lovechild - from its Nathan Zachary-alike chiselled hero with a giant rocket pack strapped upon his back to the very steampunk aesthetic and the presence of, yep you guessed it, all sorts of flying contraptions straight out of Terry Thomas' wildest fantasies.

Void Zilla
Though the trailer hinted at demonic forces straight from the ninth level of hell, the actual adversaries appeared to be machine-gun-toting weirdos donning gimp masks. Gaze past the dull-looking scrapping and shooting though and Dark Void appears to have neat tricks up its coiffured sleeve.
 

Will Metal Gear Solid 4 really boost PS3 sales?

50°
350w ago - Fanboys beware. You won't like this.

It's been the rallying cry of Sony fanboys from the beginning. Things might be bad right now, but you just wait until Metal Gear Solid 4. Then we'll see the PlayStation 3 rise up to conquer, just like the PS2 did, and you'll all be sorry for doubting it.

But will we really? There's a very good argument that Metal Gear's release won't make the blindest bit of difference to the PS3's fortunes as a format, however good it turns out to be (and there's every chance that it will be brilliant). The reason? Things just don't work that way any more.

The industry has changed a lot since Metal Gear Solid became a killer app for the PSone. It's changed almost beyond recognition in just the last twelve months in fact. Two major differences separate the way things are now from the way thing were then: The cost of making games and the kind of people who play them.
 
Sponsored Links

Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links

Sponsored Links







Sponsored Links