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Video: PS Vita Content Manager and Security Concerns of Wololo


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144w ago - Following up on the PS Vita HBL Demo, today PlayStation Vita hacker wololo has shared details on the PS Vita Content Manager and the related security concerns as outlined below.

To quote: A few days ago I posted my concerns about the “Content Manager” tool, a tool that is compulsory to install and use if you want to copy files from and to your vita. Some people said I was paranoid (see my answer to that at the end of the article), and others shared my concerns and started digging. Interestingly enough, that article gathered almost as much attention as my much more spectacular (in my opinion) video of a Megadrive emulator running on the vita.

Some sites took my words out of context and said that I had proof Sony is spying on us when we copy files. This is not true, I don’t have any proof, just lots of concerns. Because of that I decided to call Sony’s customer service in order to get more information. Read along.

First of all, a piece of relatively good news: some users on French site psvitagen mentioned that it is possible to copy Movies and Music without being connected to the internet, through the dedicated “Music” and “Movie” sections of the vita.

I confirmed this is true, so movies, music and pictures can still be copied to the vita even without an internet connection. The internet connection is however, as far as I can tell, required to copy anything else, which, given the limited possibilities of the vita, basically means PSP/Vita games and/or savedata.

In theory and from what I saw so far, the internet connection is probably used for two things: check for new versions of the firmware (an update was enforced on me if I wanted to keep using the content manager 2 days ago), and possibly do some DRM verifications. That’s the theory, and is somewhat confirmed by some early investigations of the binary by dev Hykem.

So, when you copy it to your vita, Sony checks that your Vita game or your Sony-purchased movie is actually “ok” to play on your vita, to make sure you didn’t steal it or copied it from a friend’s computer. Fair enough (although I would question why this check needs to be done there, rather than directly on the vita). But what happens for content that does not require any Sony drm check is my concern.

Even though it’s possible to copy them without an internet connection, does Sony gather any information on my music, my pictures, or my movies (and how about my games savedata, which do require the internet connection while being transferred) ? Do they collect filenames, id3 tag, or exif information? Probably not, but more transparency on the subject would definitely be welcome. This is not about hacking here, this is about sending private information to a company that has proven regularly that they [Register or Login to view links] with our data.

So, full of concerns, I decided to call Sony’s customer service today (actually my wife did it for me...). The person we talked to, as expected, wasn’t a technical person and therefore had close to no information on this. She was aware that an internet connection is required, and mentioned to us that this is written on the manual.

We explained that we knew that, and that we have an Internet connection (it usually takes time when calling a customer service to explain that you don’t have a technical problem using the software, but an ethical one) , but we’d like to disconnect it when it is not necessary, because we don’t see the point in being connected to Sony’s server when we transfer files between two pieces of hardware we own (at which point my wife added: “especially given what happened to your company recently, we’re a bit concerned about our private information“. Hehe, that’s why I love her ).

Understanding our concern the person at the customer service contacted somebody more technical to get more information on the subject. She then came back to us and told us this was in place to make sure that the computer running the content manager is correctly “associated” to the Vita. She didn’t have any technical details to share about the firmware upgrade or the DRM verifications, but she guaranteed us that no personal data was being transferred. She also gave us her name (which I won’t share here) in case we have more questions on the subject (but don’t ask me to call them more, first it’s not a free call, and second I already felt super bad to have my wife spend 30 boring minutes on the phone for me because of my new toy)

(one thing I’d like to say is that every time I contacted Sony’s customer service, their answers were fairly fast and accurate. They usually give me bad news, but they’re doing their best to help. The only time they were completely wrong was when my PSP 1000 stopped accepting connecting to Media Go. They told me it was because the PSP was a Japanese PSP, and I was trying to connect to the European store. I knew this wasn’t true since I had no problem doing the exact same thing with two other PSPs. The real cause was probably that Sony had banned my console for some reason. Anwyays overall thumbs up for the efficiency of the customer service)

So, that’s the official answer, but I’m sure some of us will pass the PC parts of the Content Manager through their microscopes to confirm if this is true. But at least now I have some official information from Sony, which is, in a way, positive. Nevertheless, it does not statisfy my curiosity on some of the files found by Hykem, (such as Mp3Promoter.suprx, png_promoter.suprx, etc… so I’m sure many people will want to learn more about this thing.

Oh, Before I go...

Note: don’t read the section below if you don’t like me when I rant, I know some of you don’t like me when I do that (Spare me the “why do you buy Sony products in the first place?” types of comments if possible, as that’s not the point)

A personal note about why I’m doing all of this, and a message to haters. There’s something interesting about fanboys, no matter how much you show them the truth and give them verifiable proof about it, they’ll always find excuses to justify the illegal behavior of their favorite company. A few days ago I started investigating the insides of the PS Vita. I got HBL to run on it, and was able to run PSP homebrews on the vita. Fanboys told me I would kill the vita because of piracy.

I also raised privacy concerns about the vita “content manager”, a tool that is compulsory to use if you want to transfer some files from and to your vita, and requires you to be constantly connected to the internet while doing so. Again, Sony fanboys told me Sony would never spy on their users, or went [Register or Login to view links] on me, telling me that Sony probably has good reasons to spy on me in the first place.

Well guess what, champions: my work on the PSP was never used in any way to pirate Sony’s content, because it is not technically doable to do such a thing with HBL. And telling me that Sony would never do something illegal to their users is completely forgetting that they intentionally did so a few years ago with their infamous [Register or Login to view links].

There’s no historical record of me being a bad guy, I was never sued or sent to jail in my life, while Sony has proven several times to engage in illegal or barely legal activities (see the rootkit case, or the Sony VS Universal studios case), but yet in Sony fanboys’ heads, I am the one with a suspicious behavior. Next time you comment on my work, just get your facts straight, not all hackers are promoting piracy, and my work (HBL) cannot be used to pirate games.

I won’t pretend I’m a fighter of freedom or anything, I do this mostly for fun, but I take extra care to do things that are legal, or at least not ethically questionable. The same cannot be said for Sony, so it is perfectly legit to have doubts about the tools they make me install on my machine, even if in the end the suspicions were wrong.

Sony lost their “presumption of innocence” rights years ago, I’d rather assume they’re guilty first, than feel sorry for myself later when the contents of my hard drives get leaked from Sony’s servers by some black hat hacker.









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JceeCar's Avatar
#189 - JceeCar - 23w ago
Ok, so im trying to install TN-V4 on my psvita (firmware 3.01), and cant seem to get Open CMA to work properly, ive searched around the net, and this forum for an answer, but i cant seem to find one.. so heres some Q's (the first one is what i believe the problem to be!):

Does the CMA installed on my pc have to match that of the ps vita? If-so does anyone have the official CMA 3.01 installer?

Does "Open CMA V5" work on CMA 3.10.7525.4 (the page says it should work on all versions after 2.0, but that info may be outdated), without updating your ps vita past 3.01? (because I couldn't get it to, without my ps vita asking to update...)

My ps3 is updated to the latest FW; will I be able to download games to my vita through my PC? (I would assume so...)

Or is there a different/better way to get the needed game installed on my vita, without updating the firmware?

PS3 News's Avatar
#188 - PS3 News - 131w ago
This weekend PlayStation Vita developer wololo has made available a guide to porting VHBL (PS Vita Half-Byte Loader) to individual game exploits for those interested.

This news comes proceeding the recent Motorstorm Arctic Edge and Everybody's Tennis PSP / PS Vita game exploits.

Below is the guide, to quote from his blog (linked above): This guide assumes that you found a [Register or Login to view links] in a game, and that you were able to write a [Register or Login to view links].

So now what’s next? Well, as you probably know if you’ve gone that far, the PSP scene doesn’t really like “hello worlds”. A hello world is nice, but it accomplishes nothing, it just draws Sony’s attention to your exploit, and you know the vulnerability will be patched soon, while nobody really used the exploit.

Well, the next step is, ideally, a HEN or a custom firmware. Of course, this requires a kernel exploit, and we know how these are difficult to find. A much more doable task, that will make lots of people happy, is to port HBL to your exploit. HBL opens the door to lots of legal contents on the PSP and the Vita, and we designed it so that porting it to your game exploit can be done fairly easily.

This tutorial is valid at the time of its writing, for all games, and up to firmware 6.60 (Vita firmware 1.61). In theory, HBL will work on future firmwares, but of course new kinds of security might be introduced in new firmwares. Additionally, depending on your game (and its function imports), the compatibility and speed of homebrews might vary.

0. Easy as pie

HBL was designed to be easily ported to new game exploits. Most Game-specific files (except one) go in a subfolder that I will describe below. To complete this tutorial, you need basic shell skills, a working pspsdk, a working game exploit and the associated binary loader / hello world, a ruby interpreter, and basic ruby skills (usually, if you know any other scripting language, you’ll figure it out easily, there are not so many changes required).

1. Get the HBL sources and compile them

The first step is to get the HBL sources, compile them, and if you’re motivated, test them on an existing game exploit, to make sure the copy you have works correctly. (As I write this, it is recommended to test compilation with either the Mototrstorm or the Everybody’s tennis exploits, as we might have broken backwards compatibility with older exploits)

The sources of HBL can be downloaded here (SVN client required: [Register or Login to view links])

In order to compile it, you need the PSPSDK (which you probably already have if you wrote a binary loader). Compilation is fairly easy, but in order to compile the HBL for a specific exploit, you have to specify the folder of the exploit. for example, make FOLDER=lifeup will compile HBL for the Motorstorm (EU) exploit.

2. Create your own exploit’s folder

As you guessed, you will create a folder dedicated to your own exploit. Let’s imagine you game is called wololo, then you can create a subfolder “wololo” in the eLoader folder. Basically, we want to reproduce the files that are in this folder for another exploit, and adapt them to our exploit. Let’s have a look at the lifeeu folder:

The folder contains 6 files and 1 folder (which contains 1 file) that you will want to adapt to your exploit. I will describe each of them separately. Most of these files are automatically generated by a script, so this should be fairly simple.

3. Create your exploit’s files

linker_loader.x

This is the linker file for h.bin. If you created a binary loader and a hello world, you already have this file from your hello world, and most likely you named it “linker.x“. Copy linker.x from your hello world to linker_loader.x. Done!

sdk_loader.S

This is the sdk for h.bin. If you created a binary loader and a hello world, you probably already have this file, and named it sdk.S. Copy sdk.s to sdk_loader.S. If you don’t have this sdk, you can create it either by running prxtool on the EBOOT.BIN of the game, or by using the moskitool (a ruby version of the moskitool can be found in the eLoader/tools folder of the HBL). Most likely, if you created a hello world, you already have this file so I won’t give more details for now. Done!
config folder, exploit_config.h, sdk_hbl.S, loader.h,

The contents of the config folder, as well as sdk_hbl.S, loader.h, and most of exploit_config.h (details below for exploit_config.h) are automatically generated by a ruby script that you can find in eLoader/tools/gen_exploit_config.rb.

The gen_exploit_config.rb has 2 “modes”, but I will only describe the first one, which is required the first time you adapt your exploit. You need to have a usermem dump named memdump.bin (that you acquired from psplink with the command savemem 0x08800000 0x01800000 memdump.bin). Important note: For Vita compatibility, that dump must be done on a PSP running firmware 6.60. In addition to memdump.bin, you need a list of UIDs from the same psplink session, that you will name uidlist.txt.

You can get that file by typing uidlist > uidlist.txt in psplink. That file needs to be in unix format, so be sure to convert it if you are running windows. Finally, you need a file named sdk.S, which is nothing else than the sdk.S you created for your game exploit, the one we just named sdk_loader.S above.

Put these 3 files (memdump.bin and uidlist.txt obtained from the same psplink session, as well as sdk.S from your exploit) in the tools folder, and run gen_exploit_config.rb

This should display a list of addresses (you will want to copy these addresses inside the stubs array of gen_exploit_config.rb so that other people who want to improve your exploit won’t need a memory dump/uidlist anymore, although they will still need the sdk.S file), and generate a series of files in the tools/output subfolder.

The files generated by gen_exploit_config.rb in the output folder can be copied “as is” into your game’s folder.
Final edits to exploit_config.h

You’re almost done, but the file exploit_config.h need to be edited in two places, that you will find because they say “TODO” in big letters.

HBL_LOAD_ADDRESS This is where you will load HBL in RAM. You want a value that is outside of the boundaries of the game, and basically, a place where the PSP will accept to alloc roughly 200kB. you can get such an address in psplink while the game is running by typing malloc 2 test l 204800

HBL_ROOT is the name of the folder where your exploited savedata is. That folder name looks like ms0:/PSP/SAVEDATA/UCUS12345000. Important note: my tutorial on how to create a binary loader assumes you will load a file named ms0:/h.bin. On the PS Vita, this is not possible anymore, so you will have to adapt your binary loader in order to load the exploit from ms0:/PSP/SAVEDATA/XXXXXXX/h.bin (where XXXX is the folder of your savedata). In the Vita version of HBL, all HBL files for in that folder, and there is no subfolder.

linker_hbl.x

copy linker_loader.x into linker_hbl.x, and replace the address value with the value of HBL_LOAD_ADDRESS that you figured out earlier while creating exploit_config.h. Done.

4. Compile

  • Run make FOLDER=yourfolder (alternate ways: make distrib FOLDER=yourfolder to remove debug messaging, make nonids FOLDER=yourfolder to remove NIDs-related heavy debug messaging)
  • You’re done, grab the h.bin and hbl.bin in the root, the config folder from your exploit’s folder, and the libs_… folders from the root. You now have the meat of your HBL port ready.

5. Last but not least

HBL is licensed under the GPL. If you plan to distribute your compiled binaries, it is required that you provide your source code as well. Don’t make us ask for it

This tutorial is voluntarily vague. Porting HBL is fairly easy, but we assume that if you made it that far, you probably are skilled enough to do some research on your own. Nevertheless, don’t hesitate to ask questions if you are running into problems

You are allowed to reproduce this article on other websites and/or translate it on condition that you put a clear link to this page in your copy.

6. More details

Porting VHBL is simple in theory, but many games do not import some functions that are necessary for HBL to run properly. One goal of the script gen_exploit_config.h is to analyze the imports of your game (this is why the sdk.S is necessary), and define some workarounds in exploit_config.h in case your game does not have all the necessary exports. This should work in most cases, but that script is still experimental and might make mistakes. Below are a few details on some of the “define” sections it creates:

TH_ADDR_LIST, EV_ADDR_LIST, SEMA_ADDR_LIST, and GAME_FREEMEM_ADDR can be computed for you by the tool eLoader/tools/freemem.rb. For that you will need a memory dump and a file uidlist.txt which is the output of the uidlist command in psplink (uidlist > uidlist.txt ). It is important to note that the memory dump and the uidlist need to be from the same session, otherwise the addresses will be incorrect. If you’re on windows, also make sure that the uidlist.txt file is in the unix format (use your favorite editor to convert it if needed). For those interested, here are some technical details about those variables, but basically the tool should do it for you

TH_ADDR_LIST, is the list of threads you want to kill. Threads are defined by a SceUID, but since this value changes all the time, what we actually want is the addresses where they are defined. in psplink, while your game (or your hello world) is running, you can get a list of these thread by typing thlist. Then look for each thread’s uid in ram. The address (hopefully unique) where the thid is defined, is what you want to put in this list.

EV_ADDR_LIST is the list of events you want to kill. You get this list by typing evlist in psplink. The rest is similar to the construction of TH_ADDR_LIST

SEMA_ADDR_LIST is the list of semaphores you want to kill. You get this list by typing smlist in psplink. The rest is similar to the construction of TH_ADDR_LIST above

GAME_FREEMEM_ADDR this is the address in Ram where the game’s memory was allocated. Most game have this but for those that don’t have it (patapon2), this value can be commented out. To find this value, type uidlist” PSPLink and look under the SceSysMemMemoryBlock section. You’re looking for blocks that have a 0xFF (user) attribute (not 000!), and are not “stack”. In the golf exploit, this block was simply called “block” and was easy to find. Again, you’re interested in the entry address, not the uid.

UNLOAD_ADDITIONAL_MODULES : define this variable if possible. Comment it out only if you run into issues at the “free memory” stage of HBL

Other variables: The variables above are the basics of the config file. With those, HBL should basically work, or at least take you to a step where you can start debugging. But with time, HBL has grown and has been updated by several people. In order to maintain backwards compatibility and increase game coverage, the exploit_config file was added several config values.

DISABLE_P5_STUBS is useful if you run into a crash/freeze even before hbl is loaded (just after firmware detection). SYSCALL_* are used for perfect syscall estimation on firmwares where this is available (TODO: explain syscalls estimation), etc… at this point you will probably need to dig in previous exploit_config.h files in order to find more on each macro you can possibly define.

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HeyManHRU's Avatar
#187 - HeyManHRU - 131w ago
Yeah, I've played minecraft on many consoles and nothing beats a mouse and keyboard for playing a game like minecraft.

Still good for minecraft fans who want to play it on the go.

SwordOfWar's Avatar
#186 - SwordOfWar - 131w ago
I must say, as a user who has put more time into minecraft than I should have, do yourself a big favor and play this on a PC if you can.

It looks very painful watching this user trying to navigate and interact with blocks using those unsightly controls.

This is one of those games that benefits greatly from a mouse/keyboard setup.

PS3 News's Avatar
#185 - PS3 News - 131w ago
Following up on the PS Vita HBL and Doom releases, PlayStation Vita developer wololo reports that [Register or Login to view links] has made available a Lamecraft (Minecraft Clone) PSP homebrew port that runs on PS Vita with a demonstration video below.

Download: [Register or Login to view links]

To quote: Christmas is really early this year, as Drakon, creator of the famous PSP homebrew Lamecraft, just posted an update of his game to make it compatible with the Vita.

Of course this requires you to run VHBL, but since we just released a new version of our homebrew loading tool, hopefully you are one of those who can enjoy it.

Check this video running the game on the Vita Screen:





Finally, from Drakon: I made small update to LameCraft – now it’s working on PS Vita ( thanks Wololo for info ). I have also fixed some strange bugs with texture packs.

VHBL is needed to run Lamecraft on the PS Vita, and can be downloaded [Register or Login to view links].

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