Everybody's Tennis Vulnerability for PSP on PS Vita is Revealed


108w ago - Following up on his PS Vita VHBL Motorstorm Arctic Edge release, this weekend PS Vita and PSP hacker wololo has revealed that Everybody's Tennis (known as Hot Shots Tennis in the US and Minna no Tennis in Japan) contains a vulnerability that could lead to the execution of external code and has since been removed from PSN by Sony.

Download: PS Vita Half-Byte Loader (VHBL) Tennis (JP/EU/US) Yosh / PS Vita Half-Byte Loader (VHBL) Tennis (HK) Yosh / VHBL r137 Tennis EU Yosh v2

To quote from his blog (linked above) as follows: Dear Sony, it has come to my attention that one of the PSP games available on the PlayStation Vita has a vulnerability that could lead to the execution of external code by some malicious users. Therefore I am writing this blog post so that you can patch the game or remove it from the PSN store as soon as possible.

Preferably, I suggest you take the money from your clients first, and prevent them from downloading the game afterwards, just like you did with Motorstorm Arctic Edge, 3 weeks ago. This way it will be a win-win situation for you, and you can always blame it on the hackers later on.

As a matter of fact, I have discovered that some "hackers" (I prefer to call them terrorists) have already prepared a tool which, using this vulnerability, could allow people to run software that would be extremely dangerous for your business, such as 20 year-old 8 bit games and 154 different versions of pong.

I think this puts your business at risk, and I've tried to stop those vilains by all means necessary, but sadly it seems they are not breaking any law. Hopefully, giving you the name of the game will help you to take some efficient action.

Those people are clearly wrong in their mind to try to play crappy open source software, when they could enjoy a great game such as Ridge Racer for less than 10$ a track, (which is clearly not a ripoff compared to the price one would have to pay in the real world to drive cars that completely defy the laws of physics. Although on that subject I woud like if you could help me, as my version of the game seems to be blocked in "demo mode" for some reason. All the 5 cars have exactly the same specs, so surely there's something I've done wrong somewhere.)

I digress. The name of the game is Everybody's Tennis. It is also known as Minna no tennis in Japan. Thankfully the game is not available on the US Vita store, so this should limit the problems on your end. I heard however that these hackers have prepared a US version of the hack just in case that version is being sold somewhere such as the HK store. I also heard people can buy the UK version from the US if they buy some PSN cards from resellers on ebay and other sites.

If I may give some advice, I think this is not secure enough. True, you did a good job in preventing people from buying games outside of the country they live in (and being a French living in Japan, I can't tell you how much I appreciate the fact that I can't buy any game on the French PSN, this is exactly how globalization should work, and it helps me sparing lots of money by not buying any game), but I think in order to avoid future hacks, you should simply prevent everyone from buying games on the PSN, which will guarantee you a complete control of the market.

The hackers also announced they would release their hack a few hours or days after they announce the name of the game being used. They claim this only allows people to run "homebrew" games and that in no way it allows people to play pirated PSP or vita games, but I think this is not an excuse to hack.

I realize it is saturday evening for your teams in Europe, and Sunday morning in Japan. I hope you will not have to wake some people in the middle of the night just to take action, I would have chosen a better time, but I myself have very little time to blog outside of weekends.

Hoping that working together we will be able to stop hackers. I seem to be one of the few people on Earth who understand that the real enemies of the Vita are not your poor marketing techniques, the terrible software such as the "back to the 90′s" netfront browser, the bad launch lineup, the delays on the playstation suite, the recent downgrade from 5 to 2 allowed copies of any given psn game, and the increasing competition of smartphones that all have better CPUs than the Vita. No, the real enemies are those people playing Lamecraft, who are clearly killing the videogame market, so let's destroy them together.

Please pay extra attention to the dev known as wth, who apparently is behind this whole thing, as well as Teck4 who apparently helped him for the Japanese version of the hack. I also heard that somes guys named mamosuke and msparky83 were involved in the testing. It would be good if you have a way to maybe track these guys' phones or something. Or maybe you can simply sue them, I heard it's something you do very well.

Yours truly, W. Ololo

Update: Following our discovery yesterday that the Honk Kong version of Everybody's Tennis was different from the 3 other ones, wth got to work and adapted VHBL to this version. I haven't tested this, but hopefully people who bought the HK version of Everybody's Tennis can confirm if it works.

WTH also hinted to me that he might be able to get rid of the current limitation on the European version of the exploit, in which people have to switch the language of their console to French before running VHBL. Stay tuned.

Thanks to the great work of wth, here is the long awaited second release of VHBL. Those of you who missed the Motorstorm exploit probably had a chance to grab a copy of Everybody's Tennis before Sony pulled it (let's be happy, they gave us a bit more than 30 hours this time, last time was 8 hours). If not, well stay tuned, there are still other PSP user exploits lying around, and I'm sure something will come eventually.

But let's get to the real subject here, this new release of VHBL. Sadly, I didn't test it myself on my Vita, only on a PSP, so here's to hope everything will go well. The full port has been done by wth (a.k.a. Yosh), with some help from Teck4 (JP exploit), and msparky83 and mamosuke (testing). I wasn't involved in this port, so all credit goes to these guys. I want to thank as usual all the developers behind HBL, who made it relatively easy to port, in particular m0skit0 and JJS. Yosh also adds special thanks to dridri85, Zer01ne, Truthkey, and other devs who kept this a secret while it was being developed. From the readme:

  • HBL port to the EU/US/JP versions of the exploit by Yosh
  • EU/US Exploit by Yosh, JP Exploit by teck4, discovered by Yosh
  • wololo for the help

Thanks go to:

  • All the devs who made HBL what it is today, in particular m0skit0 and JJS
  • dridri85, Zer01ne, Truthkey and all the other devs who kept the secret, that's much appreciated guys
  • Monsieur2T2R for the cool VHBL icons/wallpapers

Apologies to all the people who bought the Everybody's Tennis game from the HK store, it turns out that version is a 4th version of the game for which no exploit was prepared yet.

The HK version of the game is difficult to find, so if you happen to own that game on your PSP and are a bit technical savvy, you might want to give it a try and port VHBL to it. I'm convinced it's just a matter of time, it just takes one guy.

So, to whoever will do that port, thanks in advance, and to people who are waiting for the HK version of VHBL, please stay tuned. Neither wth nor me were actually aware that the HK version was different from the other 3, so it might take a while for something to be ready, but we're not forgetting you.

HOW TO INSTALL AND RUN HBL ON EVERYBODY'S TENNIS

  • It is *strongly* recommended that you turn of all wireless connections on your PS Vita, and that you use OpenCMA on your PC instead of the regular CMA. This is recommended because otherwise your console has a way to force you to upgrade the firmware even before you get a chance to use the exploit.
  • Extract the HBL archive matching your version of the game in your CMA PSP Savedata folder. It is a folder on your PC named PSSAVEDATA/[lots of random characters here]. If you don't know where it is, check your settings in CMA
  • Connect your PS Vita to the PC through the CMA, it should give you the possibility to copy the savedata from your PC to the Vita. If not, you probably extracted it in the wrong folder. (Note: You will also want to install some homebrews with a similar technique, read the section below)
  • Important for owners of the European version of the game: Before running Everybody's tennis, you need to change the language of your PS Vita/PSP to French. This is a limitation of the exploit for now, this might or might not change in future revisions. you can of course switch your console back to your own language once you are done playing with VHBL.
  • To run HBL, start the Tennis game, select "Continue" in the Main Menu. At this point, HBL should start

HOW TO INSTALL AND RUN HOMEBREW

Installing homebrew on the PSP was an easy task. On the Vita, until better solutions are provided, it's quite a pain in the rear. The CMA will only let you copy savedata, and will not recursively browse folders. To address this, HBL comes with a tool that can extract archives with a specific structure.Packaging the homebrew for installation on the Vita:

1) download PSP homebrew from your favorite Web site (wololo.net/downloads)
2) extract the homebrew somewhere on your hard drive, and with your favorite utility, zip it again with the *store* setting (no compression), in a file that you will name "install.zip"
3) take any PSP savedata (but not the one used for HBL!), and add the "install.zip" to that folder, in your PC CMA folder. so your PSP Savedata will look something like this:
in folder PSSAVEDATA/1a2b3c4def5678/UCUS12345000/ (or something like this) you will have the following files:

  • ICON0.png
  • PIC1.png
  • DATA.bin
  • PARAMS.SFO
  • install.zip

Installing:

1) run OpenCMA on your PC, and CMA on your Vita
2) copy the previously packaged SAVEDATA (see above) with your homebrew in "install.zip" on your Vita
3) run HBL (how to run HBL is explained in the previous section)
4) navigate with the HBL menu to the SAVEDATA folder, then go to the folder you just downloaded (in my example, UCUS12345000), and clikc cross or circle on it
5) At this point, the HBL menu should ask you if you want to install the homebrew. select yes, and wait until HBL is done extracting your homebrew
6) The homebrew is now installed, and you can run it by going to the GAME folder, if everything went well, a new subfolder with your homebrew has been created here, and you can run the homebrew

OpenCMA (wololo.net/downloads/index.php/download/1252) is strongly recommended to install if you want to use VHBL. Open CMA is a tool by Virtuous Flame that allows you to copy files from and to your vita without being connected to the internet. This is useful, especially if you don't want Sony to forcefully update your firmware.

Update 2: PlayStation Vita developer wololo[ has updated (wololo.net/wagic/2012/04/15/new-vhbl-version-for-everybodys-tennis-gets-rid-of-language-limitation-in-eu-version/) the VHBL version for Everybody's Tennis, which now gets rid of language limitation in EU version. Downloads:



To quote: "Developer wth released today an update to his Everybody's Tennis exploit, specifically for the EU store. This change does not improve homebrew compatibility, but will work independently of the language of your console. Yes, finally, no need to switch your console to French or Spanish.

Even though there is no new homebrew compatibility, I'm sure this will be a welcome update for those of you who are using this exploit."







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PS3 News's Avatar
#3 - PS3 News - 122w ago
Thanks, if/when found it will be useful to grab the PS Vita updates from similar to the PSP and PS3 updater links.

Below are a few PS Vita links from zecoxao and SKFU and some pics from psx-sense.nl/75005/japanse-playstation-store-vol-met-ps-vita-content-de-fotos/:

http://zeus.dl.playstation.net/cdn/JA0003/PCSC80002_00/VBiLrvpsZyzQkiwWEUZUPBZuWZCxYYefCHLlUSjJyQSpEQDqRlpnfKycoylNexQFvvfEXAjkomrWfeoomVKUCXpLsKmDTxoZhOVEw.pkg

http://apollo.dl.playstation.net/cdn/JP0101/PCSG00012_00/rmscTsUkpkCZKyRJZNqzjfCTaxcbOdIm.png

Edit: Here are the PS Vita updater links for those interested:

Retail (JP) http://fjp01.psp2.update.playstation.net/update/psp2/list/jp/psp2-updatelist.xml
Retail (EU) http://feu01.psp2.update.playstation.net/update/psp2/list/eu/psp2-updatelist.xml
Retail (US) http://fus01.psp2.update.playstation.net/update/psp2/list/us/psp2-updatelist.xml
Shop (JP) http://fjp01.psp2.update.playstation.net/update/psp2/list/shop/psp2-updatelist.xml

CJPC's Avatar
#2 - CJPC - 122w ago
Currently working on checking where the updates are coming from - it seems like Sony is doing what it can to not expose the update link. Kind of odd, eh?

PS3 News's Avatar
#1 - PS3 News - 122w ago
Update: Sony has now released PS Vita 1.51 Firmware Update (JPN), and although no official changelog is available according to PlayStation Japan the update fixes an issue with Dynasty Warriors Next that prevented players from progressing further.

With the Japanese release of PlayStation Vita slated for tomorrow, Sony has now released a PS Vita 1.50 Firmware update which allows for PSN feature access including the PlayStation Store alongside a Content Manager Assistant application for updating via PC.

Download: PS Vita 1.50 Firmware Update (JPN) / PS Vita 1.50 Recovery System Data (JPN) / PS Vita 1.50 Recovery PreInstall Data (JPN)

Some PS Vita Disassembled Pictures revealing the internal components are also available, and Andriasang.com also reports that the PlayStation Vita games ship without instruction manuals as it appears Sony is ditching a paper manual in favor of an in-game digital manual.

The package includes a single sheet of paper showing warning messages and details on a firmware update that's included on the card.

To quote from Sony's official PS Vita site: PlayStation Vita System Software Update - System software version 1.50 for PlayStation Vita Update

From 17 December 2011 and began updating the system software version 1.50. To become available and some features of the PlayStation Network features, updates the system software of PS Vita (Update) is required.

PS Vita also system software, by updating, adding and security can be enhanced many features. Please use the update to the latest version.

For more information on the latest system software features of the PS Vita Guide please visit.

Interestingly, the guide reveals that users can now take screenshots during gameplay, which are saved as an image to their PlayStation Vita Memory Stick.

How to Update

By one of the following methods, you can update the system software on PS Vita:

  • Update using a Wi-Fi - Wi-updates with the PS Vita-Fi. (http://www.jp.playstation.com/psvita/update/ud_wifi.html)
  • Connected to the PS3 update - Using the network function of PS3, the latest update file download over the Internet. (http://www.jp.playstation.com/psvita/update/ud_ps3.html)
  • Connected to the PC and update - Using computer networking capabilities, download the latest updates via the Internet. (http://www.jp.playstation.com/psvita/update/ud_pc.html)
  • PS Vita card to update - If the PS Vita card data includes updates to update using the PS Vita card. (http://www.jp.playstation.com/psvita/update/ud_card.html)

After updating, the home screen of PS Vita Setting (Settings)> [start]> [System]> [System Information and tap. [System Software] If the data is displayed and updated version, and has been updated correctly.

And update the system software update to connect to PlayStation Vita PC

Connected to the PC and update

Using computer networking capabilities, download the latest updates via the Internet. To update your system, you must keep the following states in advance the target computer.

  • Keep connected to the Internet
  • Administrative Assistant to the content you download / install the administrative assistant for PlayStation content can be downloaded from the Web site: http://cma.dl.playstation.net/cma/

1. PC, to determine whether to launch a content management assistant. You can check the computer's system tray.
2. Connect the USB cable to PC and PS Vita.
3. In the PS Vita, Setting (Settings)> [start]> [System Update]> [to be updated by connecting to a PC] to tap. Using computer networking capabilities, download the latest updates via the Internet. Please follow the instructions on the screen then.

Content Manager Assistant

Content Manager Assistant for PlayStation is a computer application that enables data transfer between a PS Vita system and a computer. By installing it on your computer, you can do things like copy content from your computer to your PS Vita system and back up data from your PS Vita system to your computer.

Download: Content Manager Assistant for PlayStation / Content Manager User Guide / PS Vita System Software License Agreement v1.1

Main Features

  • Backing up saved data and application data (game data) - You can back up the saved data for games played on your PS Vita system, and the application data (game data) for games purchased from PlayStation Store to your computer.
  • Copying music, image, and video files - You can display lists of music, image, and video files stored on your computer and transfer them to your PS Vita system. You can also transfer music, image, and video files in the opposite direction.
  • Backing up system files - You can back up system files saved on the PS Vita memory card or in system memory to your computer.
  • Performing a system update of the PS Vita system - When a Wi-Fi access point is not available, you can perform a system update of the PS Vita system using a computer that can connect to the Internet.

For detailed operating instructions for each feature, and for information about other features, see the User's Guide for the PS Vita system.

Installation and Uninstallation

Installation

Download the installation file (above) and save the file on your desktop or in a convenient folder. When the downloaded file is launched, the installation screen for Content Manager Assistant for PlayStation will appear. Follow the on-screen instructions to perform the installation.

  • During the installation process, dialog boxes might appear that direct you to download components (additional software) needed to operate Content Manager Assistant for PlayStation. If this happens, follow the on-screen instructions to download the components.
  • After the installation is complete, a message for creating the database for the PS Vita system will appear when Content Manager Assistant for PlayStation is launched for the first time.
  • After the installation is complete, if a dialog box like the one shown below appears, click [x] in the upper right of the dialog box to close it.

Uninstallation

From the Windows control panel, select “Add or Remove Programs” (if using Windows XP) or “Programs and Features” (if using Windows Vista or Windows 7), and remove the program shown below.

Content Manager Assistant for PlayStation

Operating Environment

PS Vita system

  • PS Vita system (system software version 1.00 or later)
  • USB cable

Computer running a Microsoft Windows operating system

One of the following operating systems:

  • Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 3 or later (32-bit version only)
  • Windows Vista Service Pack 2 or later (32-bit or 64-bit version)
  • Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (32-bit or 64-bit version) or later
  • 1 GHz processor or greater
  • At least 150 MB of free space on the hard disk
  • At least 512 MB of RAM
  • Internet Explorer 7.0 or later
  • Windows Media Format Runtime 11 or later (for Windows XP) (included in the installation)
  • Windows Media Player 11 (for Windows Vista)
  • Media Feature Pack (for Windows 7 N and Windows 7 KN)
  • A USB 2.0-compatible port (used for connecting the PS Vita system)
  • An Internet connection

Operations on custom-built computers are not guaranteed.

How to Access the PS Vita Recovery Menu

The PlayStation Vita Recovery Menu offers users several tools to fix corrupt system files, upgrade your firmware, format memory stick and more. It is a powerful tool and several features should be used with caution as they can remove all your settings, as well as all of your saved information.

  • Turn OFF your PS Vita (Press Power Button for 10 seconds)
  • Now press and hold “R” + Power + PS (PlayStation Button)
  • Wait...
  • Now you’re in Recovery Menu (Mode)

PS Vita Recovery Menu Options

1. Restart System
This option boots your system as normal without changing any settings or files.

2. Rebuild Database
This can be a useful feature if you have lost files on your system for no apparent reason. Try using this feature to see if it can restore those files. This will also rewrite corrupted files within the database, potentially eliminating future issues. This feature should not erase any of your saved data or settings.

Deletes messages, playlists, changes made on “Information” screens, trimming information for pictures in “Photo”, video thumbnails, video playback history and video resume information. This operation may take a long time depending on the type and number of data items.

3. Format the memory card
This will format the memorycard, effectively erasing all data currently on it.

4. Restore PS Vita System
This will restore your system to original including, formatting and erasing all of the data on internal flash and returning all system settings to default. This will not take your system back to a previous Firmware release. Use this option as a last resort, unless you have nothing on the console that you want or you want to erase everything on the console, do not use this option.

5. System Update
This can useful if your system has become corrupted to the point you can not boot. This will allow the user to update their console with new firmware via PS3, PC or PS Vita memorycard.

PS Vita Hidden System Menu

This PlayStation Vita hidden system menu is present on both PS3 and PSP, and includes the product code, release build, and other internal version strings. To access it, do the following via EmuOnPSP.net:

  • Go to Settings > System > System Information
  • Press simultaneously R1 + L1 + DPad Left + Square for a few seconds
  • Release those buttons then immediately press the start button (and keep it held)



















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