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  1. #21
    Contributor WOWchamp's Avatar
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    The newer 1080p 37" Westys had atleast 1 HDMI, so I'd just use that cable for audio and video.

  2. #22
    Registered User Naffets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by demonband2005 View Post
    Lets say the Sony BRAVIA XBR 40" 1080p Flat-Panel LCD HDTV
    for example.
    The Sony Bravia XBR appears to be a 1366 x 768 panel indeed.

    Its nothing major though, even samsung panels do the same.

  3. #23
    Registered User eternal's Avatar
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    Instead of making TVs with 1366x768 why not just make them 1280x720 then no scaling is needed!?

  4. #24
    Registered User Naffets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eternal View Post
    Instead of making TVs with 1366x768 why not just make them 1280x720 then no scaling is needed!?
    Because then there would be practically no reason for the panel manufacturers to sell the larger screens with full resolution

    Simple solution would be to put proper tft panels in tv's. However this would be very very expensive. The average user cant tell the difference and wouldn't pay the huge price difference.

    The 63 inch panel that my firm does retails at about 5000 or $9000 or so.

    The 50 inch 1366 x 768 panel is around 1400. See the difference?

  5. #25
    Registered User demonband2005's Avatar
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    Naffets

    I'm glad you responded to this thread. When I first read your message, I thought you for full of bologna. The more I have been reading, the more I am finding you are right. No where in any of the fine print for even the $3000 sony does it say that the screen is 1920x1080. It outputs in 1920x1080 mode but thats it.

    In my job, I work on high end copy equiptment. There are 3 or 4 models in each series. They all output at different speeds, yet the only differece is the space between copies and not the speed of the machine. They do this to offer more products. They dont want to reinvent the wheel each time they want to make the various speeds of copiers. I have a sneaky suspitition that most hdtvs have the hardware for all these capibilities, yet they are loaded with different firmware as to which features will be available. I have a couple of friends that work at bestbuy. I think ill try to persuade them to take a returned set and try putting different firmware on them to see if this is true. If it is then I may be able to purchace a 'cheaper' set and upgrade it to the one I want.
    Last edited by demonband2005; 01-22-2007 at 01:37 PM

  6. #26
    Registered User Naffets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by demonband2005 View Post
    Naffets

    I'm glad you responded to this thread. When I first read your message, I thought you for full of bologna. The more I have been reading, the more I am finding you are right. No where in any of the fine print for even the $3000 sony does it say that the screen is 1920x1080. It outputs in 1920x1080 mode but thats it.

    In my job, I work on high end copy equiptment. There are 3 or 4 models in each series. They all output at different speeds, yet the only differece is the space between copies and not the speed of the machine. They do this to offer more products. They dont want to reinvent the wheel each time they want to make the various speeds of copiers. I have a sneaky suspitition that most hdtvs have the hardware for all these capibilities, yet they are loaded with different firmware as to which features will be available. I have a couple of friends that work at bestbuy. I think ill try to persuade them to take a returned set and try putting different firmware on them to see if this is true. If it is then I may be able to purchace a 'cheaper' set and upgrade it to the one I want.
    The panels my firm deals with, which i won't name, are limited physically by the hardware. Not by software/firmware, it is a limitation of the panel itself so far as I'm lead to believe.

    Worth a try however I doubt it'll work even with Sony's panels, it'd cost them more money to limit them than not to. Even considering they wil sell more of the higher end panels by limiting them

    Oh and thanks

    I tend to know my stuff, Home Cinema equipment isn't actually my field of expertise but i know enough.

  7. #27
    Junior Member hacked2123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naffets View Post
    I'm running my ps3 at 1080p via a DVI-D cable to my Dell 2407WFP screen.

    Pricey screen but it looks awesome

    Just got my DTS 5.1 decoder aswell today, so sound is via optical to a 5.1 set

    I'm with Naffets on this one...My projector only supposts 1080i and 720p so DVI-D and Optical
    Great Alternative to those who don't own a Surround sound system with HDMI support or those who don't have HDMI but DVI on their television

  8. #28
    Registered User studtrooper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naffets View Post
    Oh in answer to the other question.

    The screens don't downscale the image using software, but they use a hardware scaler as far as i know. However, sometimes if the scaler on the vpu is a little slow this can result in lip sync issues. Thus why sometimes you need a video delay box.
    This used to be a problem with early DLP sets (mainly scaling 480i to the sets' native resolution), but from what I can gather now virtually all new HDTVs have fixed this problem with faster processing.

  9. #29
    Registered User studtrooper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraf View Post
    This is true. I have a 32" LG screen which is 1366x768. It can accept 1080but it will simply downscale the input to 1366x768. Heck even my 17" monitor can accept a resolution higher than the number of pixels it has (1280x1024) and it simply scales.
    Since 1080p is relatively new, usually (as in, I've never seen a set that isn't) a set that can accept a 1080p input is really a 1080p HDTV. I think a lot of people are still getting 1080i and 1080p mixed up...

  10. #30
    Registered User Naffets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by studtrooper View Post
    This used to be a problem with early DLP sets (mainly scaling 480i to the sets' native resolution), but from what I can gather now virtually all new HDTVs have fixed this problem with faster processing.
    Depends on how budget the vpu is. Most panel resellers couple cheap vpu's with good panels, advertising it as a Sony panel for instance, however pairing it with a xoceco image board for example, resulting in lip sync issues.

    Any other questions?

    Oh and I hear you all saying "xoceco - Who?!"

    Foreign firm

    Edit:

    HD standards explained.

    The number in the level of hd represents vertical resolution in pixels (normally) the letter after this determines if it is interlaced or progressive.

    480 - 852 x 480
    720 - 1280 x 720
    1080 - 1920 x 1080

    Uncommon resolutions - 576 - 720 x 576

    I say uncommon, because in the uk we don't use that standard.

    As said, i = Interlaced and p = progressive.

    Hope that clears up some confusion
    Last edited by Naffets; 01-22-2007 at 03:54 PM

 

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