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  1. #11
    Senior Member cfwprophet's Avatar
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    Yea but only if he use DHCP on the ps3 too. Otherwise normal standard will be used even if DHCP is activated. So if the console have .1 and dhcp use from x.15 to x.47 you can use 0.2 to .14 for gateways.

  2. #12
    Senior Member moja's Avatar
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    Yeah, I was more so showing someone a self-contradiction within the same post, which is kinda rare, and funny.

    OP, any progress?

  3. #13
    Senior Member barrybarryk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cfwprophet View Post
    No true !! Ths is only for DHCP but if you use it as a normal gateway and the gateway have .1 then the ps3 have to be .2 if no other device is connect to your router.
    Quote Originally Posted by barrybarryk View Post
    That's rubbish, IPs don't have to be in any order lol just not taken, in the same subnet and not 0 or 255.
    That part was referring to cfwprophet thinking the IP has to be the next available one.

    Quote Originally Posted by barrybarryk View Post
    He has Private DHCP Enabled. His DHCP range is x.15 - x.47 so if his PS3 is requesting a .2 IP it will be rejected unless you add an exception for it on the router complicating things more
    That part was more trying to explain a router running a DHCP server will ALWAYS reject a wired connection requesting a static IP that falls outside the DHCP range unless an exception has already been configured on the router BEFORE the device asks for the IP (Kind of the whole point to DHCP!) and the OP did say he just reset the router to the default settings

    Quote Originally Posted by moja View Post
    Yeah, I was more so showing someone a self-contradiction within the same post, which is kinda rare, and funny.
    Not really a contradiction, but I could have explained it better

  4. #14
    Senior Member cfwprophet's Avatar
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    Yea true but it is easyer to explain to some one other to just use the next one. You can have .1 for gateway and use .5 for the device to connect to the gateway. But if you have more devices connected its better to handle to use .2 insteed of maybe .7. Thats all why i telling to use .2. And i never haved a router that comes with standart DHCP activated. For all my routers i haved DHCP was deactivated from factory settings.

  5. #15
    Senior Member moja's Avatar
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    Barrybarryk, which router have you used that rejects a static IP outside the DHCP range? BTW, I'm not trolling, so to clarify I have never had an issue doing this with home networking equipment, so that's where I'm coming from.

  6. #16
    Senior Member barrybarryk's Avatar
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    If the router doesn't have the MAC address of the client stored in the IP table the request is denied as it won't authenticate the connection.

    Ethernet connections are not the same as wireless ones for DHCP, if it's outside the DHCP range and the router doesn't have an exception stored (I.E. The clients MAC address and the IP it will request) the router will close the connection.

    I've had that on every network running DHCP at home and at work for the last 5 years.

    Quote Originally Posted by DHCP wikipedia
    depending on implementation, the dhcp server may have three methods of allocating ip-addresses:
    • dynamic allocation: A network administrator assigns a range of ip addresses to dhcp, and each client computer on the lan is configured to request an ip address from the dhcp server during network initialization. The request-and-grant process uses a lease concept with a controllable time period, allowing the dhcp server to reclaim (and then reallocate) ip addresses that are not renewed.
    • automatic allocation: The dhcp server permanently assigns a free ip address to a requesting client from the range defined by the administrator. This is like dynamic allocation, but the dhcp server keeps a table of past ip address assignments, so that it can preferentially assign to a client the same ip address that the client previously had.
    • static allocation: The dhcp server allocates an ip address based on a table with mac address/ip address pairs, which are manually filled in (perhaps by a network administrator). Only requesting clients with a mac address listed in this table will be allocated an ip address. This feature (which is not supported by all dhcp servers) is variously called static dhcp assignment (by dd-wrt), fixed-address (by the dhcpd documentation), address reservation (by netgear), dhcp reservation or static dhcp (by cisco/linksys), and ip reservation or mac/ip binding (by various other router manufacturers).
    Last edited by barrybarryk; 10-26-2011 at 12:53 AM Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  7. #17
    Senior Member severusx's Avatar
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    If you computers are working online, then the issue isn't necessarily in your DSL Gateway device. Reset the network settings on your PS3 to default and try again.

    Quote Originally Posted by moja View Post
    Barrybarryk, which router have you used that rejects a static IP outside the DHCP range? BTW, I'm not trolling, so to clarify I have never had an issue doing this with home networking equipment, so that's where I'm coming from.
    A router/switch won't reject the connection from a device with a properly configured static IP address, that's not how they work. DHCP is not required to make a connection through these devices. However, I think what barrybarryk is referring to is actually called a "Reservation". When a DHCP lease expires on a client, it will request a new one. If the client requests an IP that is outside the DHCP Scope, it will not be given that address and will instead be given an address that is in the scope unless a reservation is setup for that client's MAC address in which case it will be given the address setup in the reservation on the server.

    It is not up to the client to decide what IP it gets from DHCP, so as long as the client is set to get an IP automatically, and the server is setup to hand out correct information, the client will connect to the internet. That being said, I would reset the PS3's network settings and try again. If that doesn't work the issue is not DHCP, it's something else.
    Last edited by severusx; 10-26-2011 at 01:27 PM Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  8. #18
    Senior Member cfwprophet's Avatar
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    I also used W-LAN and have made a acception with MAC address so that no one other can connect to my network but i never have used DHCP.

  9. #19
    Senior Member moja's Avatar
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    Severusx, that was what I was trying to arrive at. I've been talking about setting static IPs from client side, he was referring to static DHCP. Thanks to all, and hopefully OP has figured something out.

 

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