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  1. #11
    Senior Member joffe's Avatar
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    Apr 2010
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    @ragnorok161:

    the attached picture shows more likely a capacitor than a resistor.

  2. #12
    Contributor ragnorok161's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joffe View Post
    @ragnorok161:

    the attached picture shows more likely a capacitor than a resistor.
    Are you sure? Well at least I found it so I hopefully won't need to purchase one.

  3. #13
    Senior Member tragedy's Avatar
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    Mar 2009
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    SMD resistiors have codes like E6 instead of colour bands. Google is your friend. It's unlikely to not have any marking at all, although I have seen some caps without markings.

  4. #14
    Contributor ragnorok161's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tragedy View Post
    SMD resistiors have codes like E6 instead of colour bands. Google is your friend. It's unlikely to not have any marking at all, although I have seen some caps without markings.
    I'm looking at it right now with my jewelers lense (also what i used to take the pic with) and i don't see any marking on any of the four sides. I'll buy a better soldering iron hopefully tonight or tomorrow and will keep you all updated on my huge failure.

  5. #15
    Contributor joser559's Avatar
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    May 2010
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    It sucks but that is how you learn not to mess up again. I learned the same way with some laptop mobo's not good times my friends not good times. Always do a few warm up tries first on a scrap piece... better luck next time.

  6. #16
    Contributor ragnorok161's Avatar
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    May 2010
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    Alright, I tried soldering it but I just physically can't. It's impossible small.

    Anyone know if I could bring this to an electronic repair shop or some sort of hobby shop and have them solder it for me?

  7. #17
    Contributor laggmaster's Avatar
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    Sep 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragnorok161 View Post
    Alright, I tried soldering it but I just physically can't. It's impossible small.

    Anyone know if I could bring this to an electronic repair shop or some sort of hobby shop and have them solder it for me?
    Ok look at your motherboard find the NAND chips and see if you would feel comfortable removing them and being able to reattach them to another board... would probably be cheaper than a repair shop...

  8. #18
    Contributor soultrane's Avatar
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    Apr 2010
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    First,

    If having problems with a 2-pin part, I would not suggest trying any more complex soldering at this point. For this component, you could use a good pair of tweezers (sharp ends, curved ends). Something like SMD107-SA (google it).

    Take some solder wick and remove all solder from the pads. Be sure not to heat up the pads for too long or apply too much pressure or you'll lose the pad. Clean your solder tip. Use of some form of magnification and good lighting would help. A desk lamp w/a lens or a headband magnifier + utility light would work.

    With solder ready, heat the pad with the widest trace (power or GND side). If both are "skinny" traces - then just pick one. Once heated, take some solder and put a small amount on the pad so the pad now has a layer of solder.

    Take your tweezers and line up the component so it is centered over the pads. The side with the solder on the pad will be slightly raised. Heat both the component and the pad (solder) while keeping the component steady with the tweezers. Anchoring your hand on the PCB will help steady the hand. You should see the solder is shiny on the pad and component after done.

    Clean your solder tip. Quickly put a small dab of solder on the end of the tip. Use the tweezers to steady the part. Now heat both the pad and component of the other side of the component. The fresh solder on the tip should flow to the pad and component once they are heated. Once solder starts to flow, remove the heat and keep the component steady to prevent a cold solder.

 

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