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  1. #1
    Junior Member dekaspace's Avatar
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    [Answered] Advice on using a heat gun help?

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    Bought a heat gun today and so far tried it on a Xbox's ram that was fauly, a 60 gig ps3 and 40 gig both with YLOD and followed tutorials for each and each had the same issues as before I used heat gun so I assume I am doing it wrong, in fact the 60 gig ps3 doesnt even get power (though I never tested before taking apart as got from Ebay so getting a refund)

    I have a heat gun with a low and high setting, I have it set to low as when I tried high once it popped a capacitor on a old broken xbox I used for testing (that was broken beyond repair) and in each case I ran the heat gun under the board first then held heat gun about at about half hand length.

    I kept the heat gun on low over each chip for at least a minute and afterwards I could tell the chips were hot as I could feel the heat on top of them.

    So what am I doing wrong? with 3 attempts I would assume at least one might either work or be totally dead.
    Best Answer - Posted by barrybarryk:

    Yes it's hot enough, I wouldn't recommend using the high setting just the low one for about 40 secs on each IHS moving in small circles constantly, never still.

    Make sure before you apply the heat you take the heat shield off the RSX and remove the old paste and replace it with new paste on the core and some thermal adhesive on the VRAM before putting the heatshield back on and heating it'll last much longer this way.

  2. #2
    Senior Member HeyManHRU's Avatar
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    Well my advice is getting a heat gun were you can actually manually set the temperature. But I don't know much about console repairs with heat guns so I wouldn't know what's going on with you.

  3. #3
    Senior Member properBo's Avatar
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    In my experience with a low/high heat gun on ps3s, I use low for at least 5 and sometimes up to 10 minutes. I had everything I didn't want to heat covered with foil and held the gun about 3 inches away, always moving to not overheat any specific spots. If you aren't getting power on the 60gig, that may be an issue that a DIY re-flow won't fix.

    Source: I've successfully repaired 2 YLOD PS3s and 3 RROD XBOX360s with a $20 low/high heat gun.

  4. #4
    Senior Member TheShroomster's Avatar
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    You need to heat the chips until the solder remelts (around 800 degrees i set my gun to 805). anything less will just get things hot and not melt anything.. and the "chips" your heating aren't exactly the chips those are heat plates that transfer heat to heat sinks. the chips are underneath.

    So you have to get it really hot quick so everything melts back. And IMO 5 to 10 minutes is way too much time, I heat mine about 20 seconds then move to next chip, 20 seconds there and back to first chip for like 20 more seconds about 1/2 inch above chip always moving in a circular motion SLOWLY.

    PS Make sure you use a no clean liquid flux before you heat it so the solder don't crystallize and crack quicker after the repair.

  5. #5
    Forum Moderator racer0018's Avatar
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    I have never used a cheap heat gun to repair ps3s, I use a hot air repair station. But what others have been posting is correct on the temp settings. Good luck on the repairs.

  6. #6
    Senior Member barrybarryk's Avatar
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    On the 60GB that's not getting power you might want to double check the ribbon that connects the power/eject buttons to the main board. It wears down really easily and once it stop connecting properly the system will look like it's getting no power.

    You might need a magnifying glass to have a closer look at the contacts, look for any that have wore away or are scraped and shorting. If it looks in bad nick you can just trim it down a little and it'll work, but don't remove more than you have to.

  7. #7
    Junior Member dekaspace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheShroomster View Post
    You need to heat the chips until the solder remelts (around 800 degrees i set my gun to 805). anything less will just get things hot and not melt anything.. and the "chips" your heating aren't exactly the chips those are heat plates that transfer heat to heat sinks. the chips are underneath.

    So you have to get it really hot quick so everything melts back. And IMO 5 to 10 minutes is way too much time, I heat mine about 20 seconds then move to next chip, 20 seconds there and back to first chip for like 20 more seconds about 1/2 inch above chip always moving in a circular motion SLOWLY.

    PS Make sure you use a no clean liquid flux before you heat it so the solder don't crystallize and crack quicker after the repair.
    Just found out the temps from the box of the gun, 350 low and 600 high, Is that ok?

  8. #8
    Senior Member TheShroomster's Avatar
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    well considering it melts at like 800 degrees i'd say no it isn't hot enough

  9. #9
    Senior Member barrybarryk's Avatar
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    Yes it's hot enough, I wouldn't recommend using the high setting just the low one for about 40 secs on each IHS moving in small circles constantly, never still.

    Make sure before you apply the heat you take the heat shield off the RSX and remove the old paste and replace it with new paste on the core and some thermal adhesive on the VRAM before putting the heatshield back on and heating it'll last much longer this way.

  10. #10
    Contributor jykelly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheShroomster View Post
    well considering it melts at like 800 degrees i'd say no it isn't hot enough
    Hi. First time poster here. I'd just like to point out that talking about temperature without specifying Metric or English system can lead to unwanted consequences.

    In any case, 800 degrees (whether Centigrade or Fahrenheit) is too high of a temperature when talking about solder/electronics and could easily damage the board. Temperature ranges for different types of solder are typically from 120C to 310C (250F to 590F). So assuming dekaspace's gun is rated in degrees Centigrade then the low setting should be more than enough.

 

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