Page 16 of 35 FirstFirst ... 6141516171826 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 160 of 342



  1. #151
    Forum Moderator PS3 News's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    26,857
    Yep, I saw a similar article on the lawsuits starting up here as well: http://news.cnet.com/8301-31021_3-20057921-260.html
    Sony sued for PlayStation Network data breach

    Like clockwork, the first lawsuit resulting from the security breach of the personal data of more than 75 million Sony PlayStation Network customers has been filed.

    The suit was filed today on behalf of Kristopher Johns, 36, of Birmingham, Ala., in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California. Johns accuses Sony of not taking "reasonable care to protect, encrypt, and secure the private and sensitive data of its users."

    He also believes Sony took too long to notify him and other customers that their personal information had been exposed. Because of that, the complaint alleges, Sony did not allow its customers "to make an informed decision as to whether to change credit card numbers, close the exposed accounts, check their credit reports, or take other mitigating actions."

    The lawsuit is asking for monetary compensation and free credit card monitoring, and is seeking class action status.

    Yesterday, Sony warned customers of its PlayStation Network and Qriocity service that their personal information--including customer names, addresses, e-mail addresses, birthdays, PlayStation Network and Qriocity passwords, and user names, as well as online user handles--was obtained illegally by an "unauthorized person" between April 17 and 19. The company says there is "no evidence" that credit card information was compromised, but it can't be sure yet.

    In the aftermath of the breach Sony has temporarily turned off PlayStation Network and Qriocity, contracted with an outside security firm to investigate the intrusion on its network, and started to rebuild its system and security.

    Johns' complaint echoes the concerns of Sen. Richard Blumenthal, a Connecticut Democrat. Blumenthal yesterday wrote a letter to Jack Tretton, president and chief executive of Sony Computer Entertainment America, saying he was troubled that the company had not notified customers sooner about the breach. He also called for Sony to provide affected customers with financial data security services, including free access to credit reporting services for two years to protect against identity theft.
    I have merged them together and am promoting it to the main page now, and +Rep EiKii for the news as well.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #152
    Senior Member PSPSwampy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    795
    I believe this is what happened in sony's datacenter: http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/mythbusters-poop-hits-the-fan-high-speed.html

    Shame it's not on youtube - but hey...

  3. #153
    Registered User superste2201's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    46
    This is a big issue however it has been over exaggered quite a lot.

    Sony has said, off the record, to the BBC that CC data was probably not obtained. Top fraud bodys have told people not to worry. Sony reacted quite quick to this incident not giving the hacker(s) enough time to actually download much of the database, if that was even there target and they gained access to it.

    Also contrary to popular belief passwords and sensitive info are not stored in plain text, people are assuming this because the PS3 firmware deals with it in plain text before encypting and sending (hence it coming up after firmware was decrypted).

    This is nowhere near some of the biggest security breaches of the decade. Even the pentagon was hacked not so long ago.

    Also who ever hacked the network will be caught quite soon, hackers going after big targets like this hardly never get away with it.

    In fact Xbox live still holds the record for being down the longest. (obviously just ATM as PSN is not up yet)

  4. #154
    Banned User
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    149

    Q&A #1 for PlayStation Network and Qriocity Services

    Sony's Senior Director Patrick Seybold of Corporate Communications & Social Media has made available Q&A #1 for PlayStation Network and Qriocity Services today.

    In it they make mention that a new PS3 Firmware update is coming that will force PSN users to change their password for security purposes, which is now confirmed to be PlayStation 3 Firmware 3.61 via Sony Japan.

    Additionally, http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/34332/Report_Sony_Providing_New_PlayStation_3_SDKs_Before_PSN_Comes_Online.php reports that Sony is also providing PS3 developers updated PlayStation 3 SDKs that include new security features before PSN comes back online.

    To quote: First off, we want to again thank you for your patience. We know that the PlayStation Network and Qriocity outage has been frustrating for you.

    We know you are upset, and so we are taking steps to make our services safer and more secure than ever before. We sincerely regret any inconvenience or concern this outage has caused, and rest assured that we’re going to get the services back online as quickly as we can.

    We received a number of questions and comments yesterday and early today relating to the criminal intrusion into our network. We’d like to address some of the most common questions today.

    We are also going to continue to post updates to this blog with any additional information and insight that we can over the next few days.

    We are reading your comments. We are listening to your suggestions. Please keep them coming.

    Thank you.

    Q: Are you working with law enforcement on this matter?
    A: Yes, we are currently working with law enforcement on this matter as well as a recognized technology security firm to conduct a complete investigation. This malicious attack against our system and against our customers is a criminal act and we are proceeding aggressively to find those responsible.

    Q: Was my personal data encrypted?
    A: All of the data was protected, and access was restricted both physically and through the perimeter and security of the network. The entire credit card table was encrypted and we have no evidence that credit card data was taken. The personal data table, which is a separate data set, was not encrypted, but was, of course, behind a very sophisticated security system that was breached in a malicious attack.

    Q: Was my credit card data taken?
    A: While all credit card information stored in our systems is encrypted and there is no evidence at this time that credit card data was taken, we cannot rule out the possibility. If you have provided your credit card data through PlayStation Network or Qriocity, out of an abundance of caution we are advising you that your credit card number (excluding security code) and expiration date may have been obtained. Keep in mind, however that your credit card security code (sometimes called a CVC or CSC number) has not been obtained because we never requested it from anyone who has joined the PlayStation Network or Qriocity, and is therefore not stored anywhere in our system.

    Q: What steps should I take at this point to help protect my personal data?
    A: For your security, we encourage you to be especially aware of email, telephone, and postal mail scams that ask for personal or sensitive information. Sony will not contact you in any way, including by email, asking for your credit card number, social security number or other personally identifiable information. If you are asked for this information, you can be confident Sony is not the entity asking. When the PlayStation Network and Qriocity services are fully restored, we strongly recommend that you log on and change your password. Additionally, if you use your PlayStation Network or Qriocity user name or password for other unrelated services or accounts, we strongly recommend that you change them, as well. To protect against possible identity theft or other financial loss, we encourage you to remain vigilant, to review your account statements and to monitor your credit reports.

    Q: What if I don’t know which credit card I’ve got attached to my PlayStation Network account?
    A: If you’ve added funds to your PlayStation Network wallet in the past, you should have received a confirmation email from “DoNotReply@ac.playstation.net” at the email address associated with your account. This email would have been sent to you immediately after you added the funds, and will contain the first 4 digits and last 4 digits of your credit card number. You can also check your previous credit card statements to determine which card was attached to your PlayStation Network or Qriocity accounts.

    Q: When or how can I change my PlayStation Network password?
    A: We are working on a new system software update that will require all users to change their password once PlayStation Network is restored. We will provide more details about the new update shortly.

    Q: Have all PlayStation Network and Qriocity users been notified of the situation?
    A: In addition to alerting the media and posting information about it on this blog, we have also been sending emails directly to all 77 million registered accounts. It takes a bit of time to send that many emails, and recognize that not every email will still be active, but this process has been underway since yesterday. At this time, the majority of emails have been sent and we anticipate that all registered accounts will have received notifications by April 28th. Consumers may also visit www.us.playstation.com/support and http://www.qriocity.com for notices regarding this issue. In addition, we have taken steps to disseminate information regarding this issue to media outlets so that consumers are informed.

    Q: What steps is Sony taking to protect my personal data in the future?
    A: We’ve taken several immediate steps to add protections for your personal data. First, we temporarily turned off PlayStation Network and Qriocity services and, second, we are enhancing security and strengthening our network infrastructure. Moving forward, we are initiating several measures that will significantly enhance all aspects of PlayStation Network’s security and your personal data, including moving our network infrastructure and data center to a new, more secure location, which is already underway. We will provide additional information on these measures shortly.

    Q: Has Sony identified the party or parties responsible for the PlayStation Network hack and subsequent theft of personal information?
    A: We are currently conducting a thorough investigation of the situation and are working closely with a recognized technology security firm and law enforcement in order to find those responsible for this criminal act no matter where in the world they might be located.

    Q: When will the PlayStation Network and Qriocity be back online?
    A: Our employees have been working day and night to restore operations as quickly as possible, and we expect to have some services up and running within a week from yesterday. However, we want to be very clear that we will only restore operations when we are confident that the network is secure.

    Sony's Q&A #1 for PlayStation Network and Qriocity Services

    More PlayStation 3 News...

  5. #155
    Registered User Mexicodude908's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    192
    This lawsuit is dead on I don't see how at the very least Sony provides everyone with free credit card information I do not expect much money since they pay fines and lawyers and people but Sony is in a really bad situation that could cost this company millions upon millions.

  6. #156
    Senior Member elser1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    2,418
    if anyone come across a lawsuit from australia please let me know or also a site to get into these class actions please.. sony utterly disgust me with there disregaurd for customers and there safety.. i will sue 100%

  7. #157
    Registered User xUb3rn00dlEx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    174
    And I welcome the losses of revenue. Because in order to actually fix the corporate greed and boning of the consumer, you have to hit them where it hurts, the wallet. Maybe if they lose several million, or hundreds of millions in revenue, they might actually stop to think "We can't keep doing business as usual."

  8. #158
    Member SinnerShanky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    172
    I was actually waiting when Sony would get sued... If i were in the US i would have done it myself... Thank God someone did it...
    I am strongly in favor of it!

  9. #159
    Forum Moderator PS3 News's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    26,857
    I merged your post here and mainpaged it as well leukotic, cheers and +Rep for the update!

  10. #160
    Senior Member barrybarryk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,082
    Quote Originally Posted by superste2201 View Post
    Sony has said, off the record, to the BBC that CC data was probably not obtained.
    'Off the record' means it doesn't have to be true, but even if it is true and no cc details were taken it isn't really the point. By far the most important information that was stolen was the linked tables of email addresses & passwords & names & addresses
    Quote Originally Posted by superste2201 View Post
    Top fraud bodys have told people not to worry.
    Also not true, top fraud experts have told people to immediately cancel any credit or debit cards they have associated with the account (potentially even ones which have been deleted from the account since as Sony still hasn't clarified what "transaction history' means when comes to the stolen information.)

    The only people who are telling people to not worry is Sony and the CC companies who both oddly enough have a giant financial stake in whether or not people rush out and cancel their cards
    Quote Originally Posted by superste2201 View Post
    Sony reacted quite quick to this incident not giving the hacker(s) enough time to actually download much of the database, if that was even there target and they gained access to it.
    We've known the system was vulnerable for months, and by Sony's own admission the attack took place 2 days before the PSN went offline so yeah they could have grabbed a hell of a lot, not informing customers immediately was their biggest mistake, instead they decided to wait until they got positive confirmation when merely the suspicion of the hack should have been enough
    Quote Originally Posted by superste2201 View Post
    Also contrary to popular belief passwords and sensitive info are not stored in plain text, people are assuming this because the PS3 firmware deals with it in plain text before encypting and sending (hence it coming up after firmware was decrypted).
    Nope the packets were sniffed through the network and have nothing to do with the firmware, they were in plain text
    Quote Originally Posted by superste2201 View Post
    This is nowhere near some of the biggest security breaches of the decade. Even the pentagon was hacked not so long ago.
    Also irrelevant, the pentagon didn't potentially put 77million peoples personal information at risk
    Quote Originally Posted by superste2201 View Post
    Also who ever hacked the network will be caught quite soon, hackers going after big targets like this hardly never get away with it.
    Catching the hackers won't undo the releasing of the information.
    Quote Originally Posted by superste2201 View Post
    In fact Xbox live still holds the record for being down the longest. (obviously just ATM as PSN is not up yet)
    And that's just dumb, any more misguided notions on the subject?

 


 
Page 16 of 35 FirstFirst ... 6141516171826 ... LastLast