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  1. #1
    Registered User MMBtalk's Avatar
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    Jan 2009
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    The Challenges of PlayStation 3 Development


    These are my personal views about how the PS3 has got into the current struggling position.

    The number one problem that PS3 faced was the PS2. This was an excellent console, and it required a drastic approach to come up with something with a noticeable difference.

    The number two problem is that Sony does always want to bring about change, though I am not sure if "Yes we can" is always applicable.

    The PS3 is meant to change how we manage our living rooms and unfortunately these good ideas come at a price point which is not suiting the majority.

    Thirdly, the rivals have played their parts, but I see Xbox 360 as mostly working for PS3, because PS3 has been able to make all these adjustments in a hurry to come up with something even more powerful.

    In fact, we are the beneficiaries even though we are the most likely to find Xbox ranting annoying. What are your thoughts?

    More PlayStation 3 News...

  2. #2
    Registered User sorceror's Avatar
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    Oct 2008
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    142

    Sony overestimated the advantage their PS2 momentum would give them. They felt they could just put out a console and it'd sell. They also wanted to use the PS3 to help the Blu-ray format, which bumped up the cost of console significantly. Essentially they put out the console they wanted to sell, without making sure that it would be one people in general would want to buy.

    They built a really good machine, which does a lot more than just play games. But (a) the up-front cost was higher than the competition, and (b) they haven't done a good job of marketing the fact that the PS3 isn't just a game console. The first bit is amplified by the economic turbulence, and the second amplifies the first even more.

    There are other issues that don't help, but aren't in themselves dealbreakers. For example, the 360 is a more 'standard' architecture, and so is a little easier to develop for. The PS3 has a pretty powerful CPU but it's fairly uniquely organized and requires more familiarization to use properly. (That being said, from everything I've gathered, the PS3 is much more 'standard' than the PS2 was.)

    Sony can still turn things around, and at least claim second place this generation. (The Wii has won the number one spot, no way to argue that one - Nintendo gambled and won big.) A good marketing push, a concerted effort to work with developers, and even a $50 price cut would make a big difference. But it does look like that'll have to happen this year, or else...