Update: Over at PS3Dev.PS3News.com, HanSooloo has posted the following along with the relevant info: "maybe we are onto something here. I have been formatting my poor hdds with all sorts of filesystems lately and taking images of them to compare against the PS3 FS. Well, it seems like the layout "resembles" ReiserFS."

In related news, GrandpaHomer has updated to scan-0.3.1 with the changes detailed below- nice progress!
2007-04-23 0.3.1
* Changed default buffer size (-b) to 110000000 (to work with PS3)
* Changed default device to scan (-h) to sdf (to work with PS3)
* Added timestamp to verbose messages
* Display HDD size also in GB
> Added 2 new command line parameters
-f Starting possition of scan e.g.; 1000000000
-l Amounts of bytes to scan e.g.; 20000000
In X-Box 360 news, HDDHackr v0.90 is now available. With the release of Micro$oft's official 120GB X-Box 360 HDD, this tool will allow you to make your own 120GB X-Box 360 HDD using a Western Digital Scorpio BEVS-LAT (which costs around $80, nearly $100 less than Micro$oft's HDD!) Those interested can discuss it in our HDDHackr v0.90 for X-Box 360 released! Forum thread.

PSP Files: Decrypted 3.40 Impose PRX Game Plug-In Mod For PSP, SCEP v1.0 For 3.40 OE USB For PSP, PSP Content Manager v1.5 Mod For 3.40 OE-A For PSP, Recovery Boot 3.40 Mod For PSP, PSPXT 1.00 Lite For PSP, PSP7800 (Atari 7800 Emulator) v1.0.6 For PSP, fMSX-PSP v3.1.1, and Pocket Pool (USA) 77.6MB PSP RipKit.

A new week is upon us (after getting sunburned over the beautiful weekend- d'oh), and with it comes our next review- also mirrored at Reviews.PS3News.com! This week Staffer Kraken has reviewed the http://www.****************/product.php?productid=16497&cat=0&page=1 courtesy of http://www.****************. Here goes:

I will be putting the http://www.****************/product.php?productid=16497&cat=0&page=1 to the test. My goal for this review is to try nearly every possible use for this device, and report back to you, the viewer as to how well it performed. Without further ago, let’s begin.

Packaging: The http://www.****************/product.php?productid=16497&cat=0&page=1 came shipped with several other items, all were packed well with a liberal use of bubble wrap (yay!). The XFPS itself came in a rather nondescript box. It really doesn’t matter to me what the packaging looks like, but to those of you that care, see the picture (above). Inside is the unit and an instruction manual. The manual is small, but describes pretty much everything that you need to know to use it.

Construction: The unit is solid, made out of a heavy duty plastic and with its fairly large size and onboard switches, it looks like a very mean piece of hardware. It sports a whole bunch of different inputs: 2 ps/2 ports for a mouse and keyboard, 2 USB ports for USB mice and keyboards (and for a 360 controller), and my favorite, a connector to use a PlayStation (2) controller on the 360.

The Licensing Issue: Unfortunately, Micro$oft decided to make it so that no unlicensed third party controllers would work with the X-Box 360. This is similar to what $ony did on the PS2 with its MagicGate and monopoly on the memory cards. The solution then and now is to plug an official product into your unofficial one to fool the system check. For this reason, in order to use the XFPS, you must have a wired 360 controller plugged into it. Though the controller can be removed after the check, it cannot be used on its own until the 360 is restarted. This is obviously sucky, but it is not XCM’s fault. It also makes the device a bit more difficult to use, especially if you are using both a USB mouse and keyboard.


PlayStation 2 port: Normal Usage- I played Geometry Wars first. No surprise that I did better with the PS2 controller than with the 360 one since I am more used to the PS2. The XFPS functioned flawlessly as well. The game played just as well as if it was PS2 native.

Next I tried Super Monkey Ball, one of my favorite XBOX1 games, which is known for requiring precision maneuvering in the harder levels. It seemed to play a bit different than I remember, but it could just be me thinking too much. At any rate it was fully playable. This means that the XFPS works flawlessly in X-Box 1 games too.

Next I tried Earth Defense Force, a rather campy arcade style 3rd person shooter. With friend in co-op mode, I played for around 8 hours, most of which was strait through. During that time, I did not have a single glitch with the PS2 controller.

Lastly, I tried Castlevania SOTN. It is amazing that people play this with a 360 controller. The 360 D-pad is terrible, but the XFPS fully remedies that solution. Needless to say SOTN played great with it!


PlayStation 2 port: Third Party Controllers- I tried a controller by Madcats called the Retrocon. I can’t say that the controller worked flawlessly because it is a POS, but it certainly worked as well as it does on PS2, which means a thumbs up for the XFPS here.

Guitar Hero 2- Contrary to what XCM claims, Gutar Hero 2 guitars do NOT work with the XFPS. Only the red and blue buttons work and they map to blue and orange respectively. A standard PS2 controller does work, and is better than a standard 360 controller, but is no substitute for the Guitar. If I figure out a way to get it to work (which I will try), I will update this review with the method.

Lightgun- My lightgun (which is a third party one) does not work.. but I did not expect this to work. In my experience, no adaptor for any system allows lightguns to work and the PS2 lightgun is even less likely to work since it uses USB and needs to be plugged into the TV via composite. Of course this doesn’t matter since there is no 360 lightgun game anyways.


Mouse & Keyboard- Since it is pointless to use a mouse/keyboard for anything besides FPS’s, the only game I will be testing is Call of Duty 3. My PS/2 mouse is a 2$ POS from an OfficeMax ultra-clearance sale. I also tested a USB Logitech mouse which worked too. My PS/2 keyboard is an 8$ Monorail, which I love nonetheless. A 4$ generic USB keyboard that I don’t like as much also worked.

All worked with the XFPS, meaning that it should support whatever keyboard/mouse combo you throw at it. I am not much of a PC gamer, so I may be a bit off with the following. The default button mapping button seems downright weird to me. For example, pressing the number 5 is left bumper which was how you throw a grenade and 6 is pushing in the right analog stick which was melee. Luckily this can mostly be changed. Unfortunately you can’t use the arrow keys as the left analog stick, but most PC FPS fans use WASD anyways. The mouse is going to take a bit of tweaking in the sensitivity to feel moderately correct, and it still isn’t quite as solid as using the mouse on a PC, though if you are used to using a mouse on PC, you will probably still like it over a controller.

XFPS on PC- It’s USB right? What else uses USB? PCs. So it’s an interesting experiment even if it seems stupid to use a device that allows a keyboard to be a controller on a platform that natively supports it anyways. After plugging the controller in, it went to windows update, installed the driver and detected as a 360 controller. The PS2 controller then worked flawlessly through it. The guitar worked too with Frets on Fire, as long as you used the start button as the strum and not the actual strum on the guitar. Keyboard/mouse worked too, but that is pointless.

Conclusion: The device works well for most of its intended uses. The standard PS2 controller works flawlessly and the keyboard and mouse works well enough to satisfy most PC gamers. Being able to use a PS2 controller on PC with it was a plus as well. I was slightly disappointed by the lack of guitar support and the few side issues, but if you are looking to use a standard PS2 controller or mouse/keyboard with the 360 this is a solid buy, and THANKS once again to http://www.**************** for allowing me to review this product!

The GOOD:

• Standard PS2 controller works flawlessly.
• 2D games work so much better with a PS2 controller that it is unbelievable.
• Can use a PS2 controller on PC with it
• Supports third party PS2 controllers
• Can use mouse and keyboard with X-Box and X-Box 360 games
• Supports many different keyboards and mice, both PS/2 and USB

The BAD:

• Guitar doesn’t work
• Requires a wired 360 controller
360 controller cannot be used by itself as well